Best Frames for High Index Lenses

Wondering where your high index lenses will be best placed?

Best Frames for High Index Lenses

High Index Lens FramesHigh index lenses are the thinnest and lightest lenses available, and they can be inserted into a huge variety of frames. But what are the best frames for high index lenses?

Generally speaking, if you are shopping for high index lenses, you should go with a frame that has a flat front and a smaller lens size if you want the thinnest and lightest lenses possible. As lens curvature increases (such as in wraparound frames) and as lens diameter increases, your lens thickness on the edges is likely to increase. This means your weight will increase faster than lens size/curve as you move towards bigger and/or curvier lenses.

Does this mean you can’t have high index lenses in curved or big frames? Not necessarily, though there are limits to abide by. In general, safety glasses frames or sunglasses frames with big, curved lenses are prohibitively big and curvy for high index lenses. Certain high index lens materials can only be inserted into small-lens frames, such as high index glass and high index 1.70.

If you’re wondering what the best frames for high index lenses are, here’s what you should know:

  • High index lenses generally get thicker and heavier as your lenses get larger and curvier.
  • For farsighted people (positive prescription), your thickness is in the center of the lens. For nearsighted people (negative prescription), your thickness will be on the edge.
  • Sunglasses frames and safety glasses frames are bad choices for high index lenses because the lenses are so large. If you need sunglasses with high index lenses, we suggest going with a smaller frame.
  • Small lens sizes are generally less than 60mm. 50mm or less is best for the thinnest, lightest lenses possible.
  • Lenses larger than 60mm or lenses in curved frames are bad choices for many high index lenses materials, especially glass and 1.70. This is doubly true if you’re getting progressive bifocals.

If you’re looking for a great pair of lightweight and comfortable prescription glasses, high index is the way to go, but it’s important to choose the right frame.

 

If you’re shopping for high index lenses online, it’s a good idea to speak with the customer service department of the company you’re buying from to see if you’ve gotten everything right and if your frame choice is good for you.

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If you have any questions about what the best frames for high index lenses are, or what you should be shopping for, don’t hesitate to leave a comment below. Thanks for reading, and happy shopping!

Guide to High Index Lenses 3 Responses to Best Frames for High Index Lenses
  1. [...] of frame styles, in plastic, metal, or a combination of both materials. Frame colors and patterns of every variety. [...]

  2. Joan Trotter
    October 14, 2015 | 8:26 pm

    Small frames and tinted lens I e sunglasses…are completely useless as they allow the sun to penetrate the eye, therefore defeating the object of the exercise. I have heavy prescription and need the large frame to keep out the sun and also the glare of the winter snow and sun. I have been told the usual thing like they will be too heavy and also I may not be able to have them tinted…..what is the point if sunglasses without tint. Your views on this would be appreciated. Bear in mind I can’t be the only one person to have a heavy prescription wanting sunglasses, it cannot be that unusual please give guidance where to get what I need..

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